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Exploring outcomes for young people who have experienced out-of-home care

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For this study, physical and mental health, school achievement, justice involvement and child protection contact were explored for three cohorts of children born between 1 January 1990 and 30 June 1995:

  • a Care group – children who had a period in care (2,003);
  • a Maltreatment group – children with at least one substantiated maltreatment allegation but no time in care (2,761); and
  • a Control group – children with no child protection contact, matched to the Care group on age, socioeconomic characteristics at birth, gender and Aboriginality (9,955)

Young people in this study who had experienced maltreatment and been in care were more likely to have adverse outcomes in the areas of physical health, mental health, education and justice. This was true when compared to a matched group of young people with no child protection contact, and was also the case for most outcomes compared to young people who had experienced maltreatment but did not enter care. Aboriginal children with child protection involvement were even more likely to have poorer outcomes in this study.


Subjects: Australia, Research